archives

planet formation

This tag is associated with 39 posts

Rethinking the Planet Formation Deadline

Observational biases may significantly underestimate the lifetime of protoplanetary disks.

Migrating Super-Earths vs. Terrestrial Planets

Of all the kinds of planets we’re finding around other stars—hot Jupiters and mini-Neptunes and those dubiously called “Earth-like”—super-Earths orbiting close to their stars are among the most abundant. While planets so close to their stars are poor candidates for habitability, they are important to understanding the possibility of other habitable planets in these seemingly common systems.

Can Icelines Explain Uranus and Neptune?

A new hypothesis posits that the ice giant planets formed between the CO and N2 icelines in the Solar System’s protoplanetary disk.

Mercury’s surprising density: What about magnets?

A new model explains Mercury’s major density with magnetism.

How Easily Do Carbon-Rich Planets Form?

A new model simulates the composition of growing planetesimals in an evolving protoplanetary disk. The model predicts that carbon-rich terrestrial planets can form more easily than previously thought.

An Exoplanet’s Fast Spin

Planets in the Solar System with a higher mass spin faster than lower-mass planets. But what about planets in other systems? The authors of this paper make the first measurement of an exoplanet’s spin to compare its spin and mass to Solar System planets.

How giant planets affect accretion of water by rocky planets

How do giant planets affect the water content of rocky planets in habitable zones? Astronomers have run new planet formation simulations to try to answer this question.

Water ice in the solar nebula

The formation of water ice is an important first step in the formation of our Solar System. We review the process of early water ice formation and the difference between crystalline and amorphous water ice.

Disk Detective: The Newest Astronomy Citizen Science Project

Finding circumstellar disks in the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer data is a tough job, but fortunately our brains are even better suited to the task than computers! You can help by lending your pattern-recognition skills to Disk Detective, the Zooniverse’s newest citizen science project.

Flipping Orbits

How do so many hot jupiters come to orbit backwards?

Follow us on Twitter

Like us on Facebook

Astroplots

    http://astrobites.tumblr.com/post/65549158012http://astrobites.tumblr.com/post/62345439779http://astrobites.tumblr.com/post/60939853775http://astrobites.tumblr.com/post/59050954779Visit Astroplots to explore astronomy research through data representation.

Archives

Our sister sites

Enter your email address to subscribe to Astrobites and receive notifications of new posts by email.