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Ben Montet

Ben Montet has written 20 posts for astrobites

Under Further Review

Last week, NASA held the 2014 astrophysics senior review in Washington, the results of which will determine the fate of 11 missions.

A Planet for Every M Dwarf Star?

A recent result on the commonality of exoplanets has made headlines, but has it for the right reasons?

A star with a fake ID?

Most binary stars probably formed at the same time, meaning all stars in the same system should have the same age. The authors of this paper analyze a stellar binary system where one star appears to be lying about its age, as one star appears 3 billion years older than its companion.

A (Literal) Look Back in Time

Astronomers are used to “looking back in time” when they view distant stars and galaxies. The authors of this paper take a different look back in time and search the internet for evidence of time travelers.

Astrobites@National Harbor: Updates from #AAS223

The next American Astronomical Society meeting is right around the corner; we’re getting ready to keep you up to date on all the happenings!

The Little Star that Could (Teach us about Stellar Astrophysics)

Today we take a look back to 1916, when distances were measured in light years and uncertainties weren’t to be included in publications. The nearly 100-year old discovery of a small star has large implications for our understanding of stellar astrophysics, even today.

Astrobites Readership Survey 2013

Do you have five minutes? Fill out this short survey to help us improve Astrobites!

Adventures in Astrostatistics: Astrobites at SAMSI (Part 2/2)

Part two of our recap of the “Modern Statistical and Computational Methods for Analysis of Kepler Data” workshop in North Carolina, featuring both astronomers and statisticians!

Adventures in Astrostatistics: Astrobites at SAMSI (Part 1/2)

A recap of the “Modern Statistical and Computational Methods for Analysis of Kepler Data” workshop in North Carolina, featuring both astronomers and statisticians!

Gaia: The New Kepler?

There’s a new space telescope on the block, which just might find as many new planet candidates as the Kepler mission.

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