Masquerade! Dwarf Nova Faces on Parade

English

Title: Classical Novae Masquerading as Dwarf Novae? Outburst Properties of Cataclysmic Variables with ASAS-SN

Authors: A. Kawash, L. Chomiuk, J. Strader, E. Aydi, K. V. Sokolovsky, T. Jayasinghe, C. S. Kochanek, P. Schmeer, K. Z. Stanek, K. Mukai, B. Shappee, Z. Way, C. Basinger, T. W.-S. Holoien, & J. L. Prieto

First author’s institution: Center for Data Intensive and Time Domain Astronomy, Michigan State University 

Journal: Submitted to APJ, pre-print available on the arXiv

Who is Who

My favorite star is a cataclysmic variable star, or Gillian Anderson, depending on the context of the question.  This type of variable star is my favorite, because it’s actually a binary star system, instead of just a single star.  In this system, a white dwarf accretes matter from a donor star, usually (but not always) one on the main sequence.  In most cases, an accretion disc will also form around the white dwarf. See Fig. 1 for an illustrated example.  Sometimes explosions will occur within the binary, and they’re called “novae.” A “Classical Nova” (CN; CNe plural) happens on the surface of the white dwarf and is caused by thermonuclear runaway.  A “Dwarf Nova” (DN; DNe plural) happens in the accretion disc and is thought to be caused by thermal instabilities.  It’s important to remember that although they might sound similar, novae are very different from supernovae and should not be confused.

An illustration of a cataclysmic variable star.  The white dwarf is shown here as the white star on the right, while the donor star is the redder one on the left.
Fig. 1 An illustration of a cataclysmic variable star.  The white dwarf is shown here as the white star on the right, while the donor star is the redder one on the left. Credit: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss

Using observations of galaxies like ours (Andromeda, for example) & theoretical models, we can predict how often we should expect to see a classical nova, but unexpectedly the observed detection rate is significantly below the theoretical detection rate.  The authors of today’s paper hypothesize that maybe this isn’t because we aren’t detecting them but instead we do see them but just misclassify them.  Dwarf novae are one of the most common types of galactic transient and come from the same star type as CNe, so maybe we’re just confusing the two.   

Stop and Stare at the Sea of Smiles Around You

Before immediately testing the sample of all known DNe, the authors wanted to create a baseline for what they expected to find.  Two of the most important characteristics of a nova, dwarf or classical, are the time it takes to become fainter by two magnitudes from peak brightness (called “t2” in this paper) and the magnitude difference between peak and quiescent brightness (called the “outburst amplitude”). There are 9,333 (more now!) DNe in the VSX catalogue, one of the largest variable star catalogues.  The authors compared this to the ASAS-SN catalogue of variable star light curves and selected the 2,688 that were observed during outburst.  The ASAS-SN telescopes are only sensitive to luminosities brighter than 18 magnitudes, and so to get robust quiescent magnitudes, the authors further trimmed the sample to the 1,617 that were also detected in the (more sensitive) Pan-STARRS catalogue.  To create a sample of 132 CNe, 40 were selected using the method above to be combined with a 92 CNe sample from Strope et al. (2010).

Let the Spectacle Astound You

Like any reasonable scientist, after the authors collected all their data, they plotted it!  Visually, you can see a separation between the two samples (CNe in red & DNe in blue) in Fig. 2.  On average, CNe had an outburst amplitude of 11.43 ± 0.25 mags, while DNe had an outburst amplitude of 5.13 ± 0.04.  Furthermore, the authors found a 15% overlap in the outburst amplitude. The results for t2 were a little more complicated.  The CNe had a t2 value of 18.7 ± 1.9 days, but the DNe sample needed to be split into a “fast” group (~12% of the sample) and a “slow” group (~88%).  The average DNe t2 values were 2.4 ± 0.2 days and 10.5 ± 0.2 days, respectively.  The authors were able to find fits to both samples in the form of log10(t2) = B*(Amp – <Amp>) + a.  The fit to the CNe sample was not very significant (~3 sigma) and had a negative slope (B = -0.083), while the fit to the DNe sample was very significant (~10 sigma) and had a positive slope (B = 0.061).

Basically the two samples are distinct, but there’s enough overlap that maybe we’re misclassifying CNe as DNe.  Colloquially, they’re saying there’s a chance.

Comparison of the outburst amplitude to t2 (the time it takes to reduce by 2 mags from peak brightness).  CNe are shown in red, while DNe are shown in blue.
Fig. 2: Comparison of the outburst amplitude to t2 (the time it takes to reduce by 2 mags from peak brightness).  CNe are shown in red, while DNe are shown in blue.  Credit: Figure 4 in paper.

Hide Your Face So The World Will Never Find You

Now that the authors knew what to look for, they critically analyzed the 2,688 ASAS-SN DNe sample.  From analysis of the CNe luminosity function from Shafter 2017, the authors determined that a transient must have an absolute magnitude brighter than -4.2 mag.  Using apparent magnitudes from ASAS-SN, distance constraints, and dust extinction estimates, the authors were able to eliminate all but 201 from being (possible) CNe.  They further reduced this sample to 94 after eliminating those that were quickly recurrent and those with outburst amplitudes less than 5 mag.  These cuts were made since no classical nova is known to recur on timescales less than a decade and 5 magnitudes was the lowest apparent mag. limit on the CN outburst amplitude (from Fig. 2).  Finally, all but 27 of these 94 are spectroscopically confirmed DNe.  To analyze these 27, the authors used  “quiescent multi-band photometry.”  If a source is pretty blue, it’s likely to be close by and therefore likely to have a lower luminosity during outburst (hence, likely to be a DN), and if it’s red, it’s probably further away and is more likely to have a higher luminosity during outburst (hence, likely to be a CN).  Basically, blue sources are DNe, and red sources are CNe.  Using this method, 19 are consistent with DNe, 0 are consistent with CNe, and 8 were ambiguous.  So, only 8/2688 (or 0.29%) of ASAS-SN classified DNe could be CNe.

To quote the authors, “the transient community appears to be doing an effective job classifying CV (cataclysmic variable star) outbursts.” Sadly this means that there is no masquerade and something else (maybe dust extinction?) is causing us to not see all the CNe.

————————

Edited by: Gloria Fonseca Alvarez
French translation by: Celeste Hay
Featured Image Credit: Modified from NASA/CXC/M.Weiss

Français

Bal masqué ! Les novas naines défilent

Titre: Les novas classiques défilent comme des novas naines ? Les propretés éclatantes des variables cataclysmiques avec «  ASAS-SN »

Auteurs: A. Kawash, L. Chomiuk, J. Strader, E. Aydi, K. V. Sokolovsky, T. Jayasinghe, C. S. Kochanek, P. Schmeer, K. Z. Stanek, K. Mukai, B. Shappee, Z. Way, C. Basinger, T. W.-S. Holoien, & J. L. Prieto

L’institution du premier auteur: Center for Data Intensive and Time Domain Astronomy, Michigan State University 

Journal: Envoyé pour distribution à APJ, disponible en avance sur arXiv

Qui est Qui

Ma star préférée c’est soit une étoile variable et cataclysmique, soit Gillian Anderson, selon le contexte de la question. Ce type d’étoile variable est mon préféré, parce qu’il est en fait un système d’étoiles binaires et pas seulement une seule étoile. Dans ce système, une naine blanche accrétère de la matière provenant d’une étoile donneuse, qui est en général (mais pas forcément) une de la séquence principale. Dans la plupart des cas, un disque d’accrétion se formera également autour de la naine blanche. Voir la figure 1 pour un exemple illustré. Parfois, des explosions se produisent dans le binaire, et elles sont appelées « novae ». Une « nova classique » se produit sur la surface de la naine blanche, créée par un emballement thermonucléaire. Une « nova naine » se produit dans le disque d’accrétion et on pense que ça vient des instabilités thermiques. Il est important de se rappeler que même si elles peuvent se ressembler, les novas et des supernovas sont très différentes, elles ne devraient pas être confondues.

Une illustration d’une étoile variable et cataclysmique.  La naine blanche est montrée ci-dessus avec l’étoile blanche à droite et l’étoile donneuse c’est l’étoile plutôt rouge sur la gauche.
Figure 1. Une illustration d’une étoile variable et cataclysmique.  La naine blanche est montrée ci-dessus avec l’étoile blanche à droite et l’étoile donneuse c’est l’étoile plutôt rouge sur la gauche.  Crédit : NASA/CXC/M.Weiss

En utilisant des observations de galaxies qui sont similaires à la nôtre (Andromède, par exemple) ainsi que des modèles théoriques, nous pouvons prédire à quelle fréquence nous devrions nous attendre à voir une nova classique, mais de manière imprévue, le taux de détection observé des novas classiques est considérablement  inférieur au taux de détection théorique des novas classiques. Les auteurs de cet article proposent l’hypothèse que cette différence ne vient pas du fait qu’on ne détecte pas les novas classiques mais parce que nous les classons de manière erronée tout simplement. Les novas naines sont l’un des types les plus courants de transitoires galactiques et elles viennent du même type d’étoile que les novas classiques, donc ca se peut qu’on confonde les deux.

Arrêtez-vous et regardez la mer de sourires autour de vous

Avant de passer immédiatement aux échantillons de toutes les novas naines connues, les auteurs voulaient créer une base de référence pour ce qu’ils s’attendaient à trouver. Deux des caractéristiques les plus importantes d’une nova, naine ou classique, sont le temps qu’il faut pour s’affaiblir de deux amplitudes à partir de la luminosité maximale (appelée « t2 » dans cet article) et la différence de magnitude entre la luminosité maximale et la luminosité de repos (appelée « amplitude éclatante »). Il y a 9 333 (et encore plus maintenant!) novas naines  dans le catalogue de VSX, l’un des plus grands catalogues d’étoiles variables. Les auteurs ont comparé cela au catalogue de ASAS-SN de lumière des étoiles variables et ils ont sélectionné les 2 688 qui ont été observées lors de leurs explosions. Les télescopes ASAS-SN ne sont sensibles qu’aux luminosités supérieures de 18 magnitudes et donc pour obtenir des magnitudes de repos robustes, les auteurs ont encore réduit leur échantillon aux 1617 qui ont également été détectés dans le catalogue Pan-STARRS (qui est plus sensible). Pour créer un échantillon de 132 noves classiques, 40 ont été sélectionnés en utilisant la méthode ci-dessus pour être combinés avec un échantillon de 92 novas classiques de Strope et al. (2010).

Laissez le spectacle vous impressionner 

Comme tous scientifiques raisonnables, après avoir collectionné leurs datas, les auteurs ont tracé leurs datas! Visuellement, vous pouvez voir une séparation entre les deux échantillons (novas classiques en rouge et novas naines en bleu) dans la figure 2. En moyenne, les novas classiques avaient une amplitude de sortie de 11,43 ± 0,25 magnitudes , tandis que les novas naines avaient une amplitude éclatante de sortie de 5,13 ± 0,04. De plus, les auteurs ont trouvé un chevauchement de 15% dans l’amplitude éclatante. Les résultats pour t2 étaient un peu plus compliqués. La nova classique avait une valeur t2 de 18,7 ± 1,9 jours, mais l’échantillon de la nova naine devait être divisé en un groupe « rapide » (~ 12% de l’échantillon) et un groupe « lent » (~ 88%). Les valeurs moyennes t2 pour les novas naines étaient respectivement de 2,4 ± 0,2 jours et 10,5 ± 0,2 jours. Les auteurs ont pu trouver des matchs aux deux échantillons sous la forme de log10 (t2) = B * (Amp – <Amp>) + a. Le match pour l’échantillon de nova classique n’était pas très significatif (~ 3 sigma) et avait une pente négative (B = -0,083), tandis que le match à l’échantillon de la nova naine était très significatif (~ 10 sigma) et avait une pente positive (B = 0,061).

En gros, les deux échantillons sont distincts, mais il y a suffisamment de chevauchement pour que nous nous trompons en classifiant les novas classiques comme des novas naines. Pour vulgariser, ils disent qu’il y a une chance.

Comparaison de l’amplitude éclatante de t2 (le temps que ça prend pour se réduire de 2 magnitudes a partir d’une luminosité maximale).  Les novas classiques sont marquées en rouge et les novas naines en bleu.
Figure 2: Comparaison de l’amplitude éclatante de t2 (le temps que ça prend pour se réduire de 2 magnitudes a partir d’une luminosité maximale).  Les novas classiques sont marquées en rouge et les novas naines en bleu.  Crédit : Figure 4 dans l’article.

Cachez-vous le visage et le monde va jamais vous retrouver 

Maintenant vu comme les auteurs savaient ce qu’il fallait rechercher, ils ont analysé l’échantillon de novas naines de 2 688 ASAS-SN. À partir de l’analyse de la fonction de luminosité des novas classiques de Shafter (2017), les auteurs ont déterminé qu’un transitoire doit avoir une magnitude absolue qui est supérieure à -4,2 mag. En utilisant les magnitudes apparentes de l’ASAS-SN, les contraintes de distance et les estimations d’extinction de poussière, les auteurs ont pu éliminer tout sauf 201 comme (possible) novas classiques. Ils ont réduit cet échantillon à 94 après avoir éliminé ceux qui étaient rapidement récurrents et ceux avec des amplitudes d’explosion inférieures à 5 magnitudes. Ces coupes ont été faites puisqu’aucune nova classique n’est connue pour se reproduire sur des échelles de temps inférieures à une décennie et que 5 magnitudes étaient la limite de magnitude apparente la plus basse de l’amplitude éclatante des novas classiques (à partir de la figure 2). Enfin, tous sauf 27 de ces 94 sont des novas naines confirmées par spectroscopie. Pour analyser ces 27, les auteurs ont utilisé la « photométrie multibande latente ». Si une source est assez bleue, c’est probablement proche et donc susceptible d’avoir une luminosité plus faible pendant une explosion (donc, probablement une nova naine), et si elle est rouge, elle est probablement plus éloignée et est plus susceptible d’avoir une luminosité plus élevée pendant l’explosion (par conséquent, probablement une nova classique). Fondamentalement, les sources bleues sont les novas naines et les sources rouges sont les novas classiques. En utilisant cette méthode, 19 sont cohérents avec les novas naines, 0 sont cohérents avec les novas classiques et 8 sont ambigus. Donc seulement 8/2688 (ou 0,29%) des novas naines classées ASAS-SN pourraient être des novas classiques.

Pour citer les auteurs, « la communauté transitoire semble faire un travail efficace pour classer les explosions des étoiles variables et cataclysmiques). » Malheureusement, cela signifie qu’il n’y a pas de bal masqué et que quelque chose d’autre (peut-être l’extinction de poussière?) nous empêche de voir toutes les novas classiques. 

————————

Corrigé par: Gloria Fonseca Alvarez
Traduit en français par: Celeste Hay
Crédit d’image: modifié de NASA/CXC/M.Weiss

About Huei Sears

Huei Sears is a third-year graduate student at Northwestern University studying astrophysics! Her research is focused on Gamma-Ray Burst host galaxies. In addition to research, she cares a lot about science communication, and is always looking for ways to make science more accessible. In her free time, she enjoys walking along the lake, listening to Taylor Swift, & watching the X-Files.

Leave a Reply